The World Awake


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The World Awake:

The impact of night time hypoglycaemia (hypos)

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About The World Awake global patient survey

All statistics are based on responses from The World Awake survey. The World Awake survey was a market research study funded by Novo Nordisk A/S and supported by the International Diabetes Federation. It was conducted by Aequus Research Ltd amongst 1,107 adults (>18 years) with Type 1 diabetes (536 adults) or Type 2 diabetes (571 adults) between July-September 2013. The survey was run in seven countries: Argentina (173 respondents), Canada (170 respondents), France (171 respondents), India (173 respondents), Japan (150 respondents), Sweden (100 respondents) and the UK (170 respondents). All participants were treated with insulin and had experienced a night time hypo (also known as a night time low blood sugar event taking place while asleep) which they could self-treat in the 30 days prior to the survey. For more information, visit www.worldawake.info.

All statistics shown below are global

Roll over an individual country’s name to view its statistics. All mentions below of night time hypos refer to events which could be self-treated.

Worry about night time hypos

Roll over an individual country’s name to view its statistics. All statistics are based on responses from The World Awake survey.

77%or over three quarters of people with diabetes worry about having a night time hypo

Of those who worried about experiencing a night time hypo75%stated that the worry impacted their sleep 

19%or almost one in five, stated that the worry causes them severe sleep disturbances / insomnia

85%or over three quarters of people with diabetes worry about having a night time hypo

Of those who worried about experiencing a night time hypo72%stated that the worry impacted their sleep

14%or nearly one in five, stated that the worry causes them severe sleep disturbances / insomnia

69%or over three quarters of people with diabetes worry about having a night time hypo

Of those who worried about experiencing a night time hypo69%stated that the worry impacted their sleep

9%or almost one in ten, stated that the worry causes them severe sleep disturbances / insomnia

77%or over three quarters of people with diabetes worry about having a night time hypo

Of those who worried about experiencing a night time hypo85%stated that the worry impacted their sleep

17%or almost one in five, stated that the worry causes them severe sleep disturbances / insomnia

87%or over three quarters of people with diabetes worry about having a night time hypo

Of those who worried about experiencing a night time hypo88%stated that the worry impacted their sleep

41%or nearly one in two, stated that the worry causes them severe sleep disturbances / insomnia

81%or over three quarters of people with diabetes worry about having a night time hypo

Of those who worried about experiencing a night time hypo83%stated that the worry impacted their sleep

19%or almost one in five, stated that the worry causes them severe sleep disturbances / insomnia

53%or over half of people with diabetes worry about having a night time hypo

Of those who worried about experiencing a night time hypo51%stated that the worry impacted their sleep

9%or almost one in ten, stated that the worry causes them severe sleep disturbances / insomnia

77%or over three quarters of people with diabetes worry about having a night time hypo

Of those who worried about experiencing a night time hypo67%stated that the worry impacted their sleep

18%or almost one in five, stated that the worry causes them severe sleep disturbances / insomnia

Night time hypos in numbers

Roll over an individual country’s name to view its statistics. All statistics are based on responses from The World Awake survey.

Overall respondents had experienced an average of 3 night time hypos in the previous 30 days.

66

Percent

were aware they had experienced a night time hypo because they woke up with the symptoms / didn’t feel well when they woke up

47

Percent

did not in any way record any of the hypos which they had experienced

44

Percent

believe there is a possibility that they had experienced more night time hypos than they realised

72

Percent

were aware they had experienced a night time hypo because they woke up with the symptoms / didn’t feel well when they woke up

41

Percent

did not in any way record any of the hypos which they had experienced

41

Percent

believe there is a possibility that they had experienced more night time hypos than they realised

71

Percent

were aware they had experienced a night time hypo because they woke up with the symptoms / didn’t feel well when they woke up

56

Percent

did not in any way record any of the hypos which they had experienced

41

Percent

believe there is a possibility that they had experienced more night time hypos than they realised

70

Percent

were aware they had experienced a night time hypo because they woke up with the symptoms / didn’t feel well when they woke up

53

Percent

did not in any way record any of the hypos which they had experienced

44

Percent

believe there is a possibility that they had experienced more night time hypos than they realised

32

Percent

were aware they had experienced a night time hypo because they woke up with the symptoms / didn’t feel well when they woke up

38

Percent

did not in any way record any of the hypos which they had experienced

64

Percent

believe there is a possibility that they had experienced more night time hypos than they realised

66

Percent

were aware they had experienced a night time hypo because they woke up with the symptoms / didn’t feel well when they woke up

40

Percent

did not in any way record any of the hypos which they had experienced

42

Percent

believe there is a possibility that they had experienced more night time hypos than they realised

86

Percent

were aware they had experienced a night time hypo because they woke up with the symptoms / didn’t feel well when they woke up

64

Percent

did not in any way record any of the hypos which they had experienced

32

Percent

believe there is a possibility that they had experienced more night time hypos than they realised

73

Percent

were aware they had experienced a night time hypo because they woke up with the symptoms / didn’t feel well when they woke up

45

Percent

did not in any way record any of the hypos which they had experienced

39

Percent

believe there is a possibility that they had experienced more night time hypos than they realised

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Conversations with HCPs

Roll over an individual country’s name to view its statistics. All statistics are based on responses from The World Awake survey.

49

Percent

or almost half did not discuss any of the night time hypos which they had experienced in the last 30 days with their Primary Care Physician (PCP)

20

Percent

did not discuss their night time hypos with any healthcare professional

45

Percent

or almost half did not discuss any of the night time hypos which they had experienced in the last 30 days with their Primary Care Physician (PCP)

10

Percent

did not discuss their night time hypos with any healthcare professional

56

Percent

or over half did not discuss any of the night time hypos which they had experienced in the last 30 days with their Primary Care Physician (PCP)

27

Percent

did not discuss their night time hypos with any healthcare professional

35

Percent

or over a third did not discuss any of the night time hypos which they had experienced in the last 30 days with their Primary Care Physician (PCP)

15

Percent

did not discuss their night time hypos with any healthcare professional

18

Percent

or almost one in five did not discuss any of the night time hypos which they had experienced in the last 30 days with their Primary Care Physician (PCP)

1

Percent

did not discuss their night time hypos with any healthcare professional

57

Percent

or over half did not discuss any of the night time hypos which they had experienced in the last 30 days with their Primary Care Physician (PCP)

21

Percent

did not discuss their night time hypos with any healthcare professional

82

Percent

or over three quarters did not discuss any of the night time hypos which they had experienced in the last 30 days with their Primary Care Physician (PCP)

38

Percent

did not discuss their night time hypos with any healthcare professional

64

Percent

or over half did not discuss any of the night time hypos which they had experienced in the last 30 days with their Primary Care Physician (PCP)

36

Percent

did not discuss their night time hypos with any healthcare professional

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Reasons why people with diabetes did not discuss their night time hypos with their Primary Care Physician (PCP):

Roll over an individual country’s name to view its statistics. All statistics are based on responses from The World Awake survey.

23%

did not feel their night time hypos were relevant or important enough to report

 

10%

did not want to waste their PCP’s time

 

13%

felt their PCP knew / assumed these events were taking place

12%

did not feel their night time hypos were relevant or important enough to report

 

5%

did not want to waste their PCP’s time

 

9%

felt their PCP knew / assumed these events were taking place

31%

did not feel their night time hypos were relevant or important enough to report

 

9%

did not want to waste their PCP’s time

 

9%

felt their PCP knew / assumed these events were taking place

25%

did not feel their night time hypos were relevant or important enough to report

 

17%

did not want to waste their PCP’s time

 

12%

felt their PCP knew / assumed these events were taking place

29%

did not feel their night time hypos were relevant or important enough to report

 

6%

did not want to waste their PCP’s time

 

55%

felt their PCP knew / assumed these events were taking place

14%

did not feel their night time hypos were relevant or important enough to report

 

7%

did not want to waste their PCP’s time

 

22%

felt their PCP knew / assumed these events were taking place

20%

did not feel their night time hypos were relevant or important enough to report

 

4%

did not want to waste their PCP’s time

 

6%

felt their PCP knew / assumed these events were taking place

31%

did not feel their night time hypos were relevant or important enough to report

 

20%

did not want to waste their PCP’s time

 

5%

felt their PCP knew / assumed these events were taking place

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Family and relationships

Roll over an individual country’s name to view its statistics. All statistics are based on responses from The World Awake survey.

When asked to rate the impact of having a night time hypo on their relationships:

34

Percent

reported that it had more than a moderate impact on their relationship with their partner

30

Percent

reported that it had more than a moderate impact on their relationship with their family / children

12

Percent

reported that it had more than a moderate impact on their relationship with their partner

14

Percent

reported that it had more than a moderate impact on their relationship with their family / children

30

Percent

reported that it had more than a moderate impact on their relationship with their partner

20

Percent

reported that it had more than a moderate impact on their relationship with their family / children

36

Percent

reported that it had more than a moderate impact on their relationship with their partner

32

Percent

reported that it had more than a moderate impact on their relationship with their family / children

61

Percent

reported that it had more than a moderate impact on their relationship with their partner

58

Percent

reported that it had more than a moderate impact on their relationship with their family / children

39

Percent

reported that it had more than a moderate impact on their relationship with their partner

40

Percent

reported that it had more than a moderate impact on their relationship with their family / children

26

Percent

reported that it had more than a moderate impact on their relationship with their partner

18

Percent

reported that it had more than a moderate impact on their relationship with their family / children

25

Percent

reported that it had more than a moderate impact on their relationship with their partner

20

Percent

reported that it had more than a moderate impact on their relationship with their family / children

 

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Impact on diabetes self-management

Roll over an individual country’s name to view its statistics. All statistics are based on responses from The World Awake survey.

Those who worry about night time hypos stated that this worry impacted the management of their condition in the following ways:

49

Percent

increased the frequency of blood glucose monitoring

42

Percent

changed what they ate throughout the day

39

Percent

intentionally allowed high glucose levels before bed by eating sugar or a snack

39

Percent

reduced their dose (or doses) of insulin

22

Percent

changed insulin schedules (i.e. taking a dose or doses of insulin either more than two hours earlier or later than they should have)

20

Percent

missed out an insulin dose or doses

64

Percent

increased the frequency of blood glucose monitoring

54

Percent

changed what they ate throughout the day

29

Percent

intentionally allowed high glucose levels before bed by eating sugar or a snack

24

Percent

reduced their dose (or doses) of insulin

21

Percent

changed insulin schedules (i.e. taking a dose or doses of insulin either more than two hours earlier or later than they should have)

8

Percent

missed out an insulin dose or doses

40

Percent

increased the frequency of blood glucose monitoring

44

Percent

changed what they ate throughout the day

45

Percent

intentionally allowed high glucose levels before bed by eating sugar or a snack

48

Percent

reduced their dose (or doses) of insulin

19

Percent

changed insulin schedules (i.e. taking a dose or doses of insulin either more than two hours earlier or later than they should have)

26

Percent

missed out an insulin dose or doses

46

Percent

increased the frequency of blood glucose monitoring

43

Percent

changed what they ate throughout the day

31

Percent

intentionally allowed high glucose levels before bed by eating sugar or a snack

32

Percent

reduced their dose (or doses) of insulin

17

Percent

changed insulin schedules (i.e. taking a dose or doses of insulin either more than two hours earlier or later than they should have)

13

Percent

missed out an insulin dose or doses

35

Percent

increased the frequency of blood glucose monitoring

48

Percent

changed what they ate throughout the day

33

Percent

intentionally allowed high glucose levels before bed by eating sugar or a snack

35

Percent

reduced their dose (or doses) of insulin

28

Percent

changed insulin schedules (i.e. taking a dose or doses of insulin either more than two hours earlier or later than they should have)

34

Percent

missed out an insulin dose or doses

49

Percent

increased the frequency of blood glucose monitoring

38

Percent

changed what they ate throughout the day

41

Percent

intentionally allowed high glucose levels before bed by eating sugar or a snack

48

Percent

reduced their dose (or doses) of insulin

21

Percent

changed insulin schedules (i.e. taking a dose or doses of insulin either more than two hours earlier or later than they should have)

14

Percent

missed out an insulin dose or doses

59

Percent

increased the frequency of blood glucose monitoring

31

Percent

changed what they ate throughout the day

61

Percent

intentionally allowed high glucose levels before bed by eating sugar or a snack

49

Percent

reduced their dose (or doses) of insulin

22

Percent

changed insulin schedules (i.e. taking a dose or doses of insulin either more than two hours earlier or later than they should have)

18

Percent

missed out an insulin dose or doses

57

Percent

increased the frequency of blood glucose monitoring

32

Percent

changed what they ate throughout the day

49

Percent

intentionally allowed high glucose levels before bed by eating sugar or a snack

43

Percent

reduced their dose (or doses) of insulin

22

Percent

changed insulin schedules (i.e. taking a dose or doses of insulin either more than two hours earlier or later than they should have)

25

Percent

missed out an insulin dose or doses